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Posts marked earth science

Some of the 12 Wonderful Hot Springs featured on the The World Geography site. Check it out for more beautiful photos and to learn more about these geologic formations.

The Telegraph’s gallery Amazing photographs of huge cave systems in Thailand lives up to its name.

Twisted Sifter has put together a terrific gallery of the 15 of the Most Beautiful Crater Lakes.

Waves by Piet Flour

From the series Harsh by Mark Boyle.

Boyle on his photography:

I guess it enables me to always see the world around me as though it was for the first time. It is always fresh with new things to see everywhere. I think as we grow older we tend to notice less and less of the world around us, it all becomes familiar and unsurprising. Photography prevents this and lets me see the world as a child does with wide eyes and a sense of wonder.

These spectacular photos of icebergs are by David Burdeny.

Burdeny on his project:

During 2007 and into the spring of 2008, I made several long journeys to the upper and lower extremes of our planet to photograph the shorelines, monolithic ice forms and landscapes of Greenland, Icelandic and Antarctica. Most of these places are arduous to reach, beyond the borders of domestic transportation routes, accessible only by small aircraft or boat. All are endangered to some extent – threatened by tourism, climate change, industry and the hunt for oil.

This new series, Icebergs begins to explore what are currently the most geopolitical and geographically sensitive shorelines on earth.

Formally different than my previous work, but motivated by similar principals, these images attempt to encapsulate both the otherworldliness and the vital reality of the northern seas and oceans. I was drawn to the fragility and grace of the frozen landscape. For me, the work is both a celebration of nature’s survival and an elegy.

The waterfalls and river streams of Armenia appear almost otherworldly in these long exposure photos from Suren Manvelyan’s Water series.

Tungurahua Erupts by Patrick Taschler 
About the image:

Volcano Tungurahua sometimes erupts spectacularly. Pictured above, molten rock so hot it glows visibly pours down the sides of the 5,000-meter high Tungurahua, while a cloud of dark ash is seen being ejected toward the left. Wispy white clouds flow around the lava-lit peak, while a star-lit sky shines in the distance. The above image was captured in 2006 as ash fell around the adventurous photographer. Located in Ecuador, Tungurahua has become active roughly every 90 years for the last 1,300 years.

Tungurahua Erupts by Patrick Taschler 

About the image:

Volcano Tungurahua sometimes erupts spectacularly. Pictured above, molten rock so hot it glows visibly pours down the sides of the 5,000-meter high Tungurahua, while a cloud of dark ash is seen being ejected toward the left. Wispy white clouds flow around the lava-lit peak, while a star-lit sky shines in the distance. The above image was captured in 2006 as ash fell around the adventurous photographer. Located in Ecuador, Tungurahua has become active roughly every 90 years for the last 1,300 years.

The Telegraph has put together a wonderful gallery of beautiful blue icebergs and glacier lakes in Iceland

Portugal’s night sky is pretty in purple in these images photographed and composited by Jorge Maia.

This incredible photo of a thunderstorm at Toroweap Point in the Grand Canyon is by Bret Webster.

This incredible photo of a thunderstorm at Toroweap Point in the Grand Canyon is by Bret Webster.

Iceland lives up to its name in these awesome photos of ice caves by Kanya Hanklang 

View this Telegraph gallery of creatures of the deep at your own risk. They are the stuff nightmares are made of.


This photo of the Rakaia River in New Zealand won the honor of being Digital Globe’s Top Image of 2011. Click through to learn more about the Rakaia River.

This photo of the Rakaia River in New Zealand won the honor of being Digital Globe’s Top Image of 2011. Click through to learn more about the Rakaia River.

Usually it’s better to get close to a story to understand it, but to fully appreciate the scale of disasters like the ones pictured above you need to get much farther away. Satellite images show natural and manmade disasters in a way that’s impossible to see from the ground. Click on the images for basic information on location and event and visit Digital Globe to learn more.